Required Help Filing Insolvency? Try These Ideas!

Anyone who has considered filing for personal bankruptcy can attest to the uncertainty and alarm the very idea of the process can cause. This does not need to be the case, however, because by gaining a bit of knowledge about bankruptcy, it is possible to sort through the worry and see the truth. By applying these tips to your own financial situation, you can determine whether bankruptcy represents a smart way to get a fresh start.

A huge mistake people make before filing for bankruptcy is maxing out their credit cards. This can lead to disaster when you file and the credit card companies might not discharge the debt. If you can, you need to stop using your credit cards at least six months before you file, and ideally for a year prior. Also, do your best to pay the minimum payments on these cards for at least six months before you file.



Don't charge up your credit cards knowing you are going to file bankruptcy, if you have already started the process or made recent purchases for luxury items. While this type of purchasing is still part of your "�debt,' it is likely that you'll still be responsible for repaying the money for those items. In most cases, what you are attempting to do is obvious.

Don't let bill collectors convince you that you are ineligible for bankruptcy. Debt collectors do not want you to file bankruptcy under any circumstances because it means that they will not get the money you owe them, so they will always tell you that you do not qualify when given the chance. The only way to truly know if you qualify is to do some research or speak with a bankruptcy attorney.

Ask friends and family for moral support. They may not be able to lend you money, but you should be able to tell them about your hardships and to lean on them. It can be hard to talk about money with the people close to you. You will likely find that they are much more supportive than you expect.

Once you have filed for bankruptcy, do not discontinue payment on secured loans. These loans are the ones for your car or your home. Even if you are not receiving paper bills or statements on these accounts, make the regular payment on time, each month. These are likely the possessions you do not want included from the bankruptcy.

Before deciding to file for bankruptcy, you may want to look into other options. Remember, when you file for bankruptcy, you are greatly hurting your credit score, which in turn, can prohibit you from buying a house, car, and other big purchases. Consider safer, alternative methods first, such as consumer credit counseling.

If you have a credit card with your local credit union, it may be one that does not have to be given up due to bankruptcy. Check with your credit union to find out if the line of credit will continue after the bankruptcy is final. You still must be sure to include it on your application with your other debts.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

Knowing that you are required to disclose anything that you have sold, given away or transferred in the two years prior to filing can help you avoid a costly mistake. Full disclosure is required. Not disclosing everything can land you in jail or a discharge of your personal bankruptcy petition.

Be selective. You may have learned that you must continue to pay for auto and home loans, and to stop paying your credit card bills immediately. That money could be put to much better use somewhere else. Continuing payments on these accounts is wasted money. Apply it to the lines of credit that you plan to keep.


Learn from it. Bankruptcy is a great chance for a fresh start. However, bankruptcy is not the end of problems. You must remember to use the fresh start to begin re-building your credit and learning how to budget and spend wisely. You can find a course either online or through the court to help with this.

When you plan on filing for bankruptcy, you want to protect any assets you can legally protect. During the process, your creditors are likely to liquidate assets of yours whenever possible to fulfill your financial obligations to them. Some assets are untouchable though, so make sure you take the proper steps to protect them. Your retirement account and your home are both untouchable when it comes to liquidation.

If you have to get a new car while in Chapter 13 bankruptcy, don't try to get approval for the most expensive car on the market. Your trustee won't approve your plan if it includes a luxury vehicle, and you probably can't afford a high car note anyway. Stick with a reliable, but cheap vehicle, to ensure you can afford your new purchase.

It is often thought that filing for personal bankruptcy will leave you homeless. Meanwhile, it is true that some or all of your possessions are seized by debtors. Most filers get to keep their homes. https://www.law360.com/articles/840383/a-compelling-case-for-uniform-wage-garnishment-laws depends if there is a second mortgage taken out, or the overall value of the home has decreased.

Do not view bankruptcy as the end of your financial health. You can rebuilt your credit post-bankruptcy. The important thing is to plan, budget, and avoid racking up debts the way you did in the past. With patience, effort, and determination, you can rebuild both your credit. Your health of your financial accounts, and holdings.

There are two common types of personal bankruptcy. One in which all your assets are liquidated and the other creates a plan to pay off debts within a few years. It is recommended that you meet with an attorney to determine which type of bankruptcy is best for your particular situation.

In recent years, the topic of personal bankruptcy has taken on increased significance, as a result of the financial crisis. An incredible amount of discussion and debate has centered around how, when and why an individual consumer might consider filing a bankruptcy petition. Investing the time necessary to sift through the noise and educate yourself about the process can be the smartest financial decision you can make. Apply the concepts in this article to your circumstances, and you may be able to begin anew with a clean financial slate.

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